Thrufters & Throughstones

‘Thrufters & Throughstones: The Music of Vermont’s First 400 Years’ is a two-CD collection of contemporary originals and historic recreations of music found in Vermont throughout the last four centuries, produced for the Lake Champlain Quadricentennial Celebration.

The project is a collaboration of Big Heavy World’s Vermont Music Library, The Vermont Folklife Center, and the Vermont Historical Society and sponsored by The Burlington Free Press, Burlington Telecom, Egan Media, The UVM Lane Series, PLACE Creative Company & Vermont Public Radio.

ITunes Store

[TOC]

Track List, Disc 1

  1. Jesse Bowman Bruchac, “Greeting on Flute” 1:12
  2. Va-et-Vient, “A la claire fontaine (At the clear fountain)” 4:02
  3. Hanaford’s Volunteers Fyfe and Drum Corps, “The Moon and the Seven Stars” 1:25
  4. Va-et-Vient, “J’entends le moulin (I hear the mill)” 3:00
  5. Bayley Hazen Singers, Village Harmony & Friends, “Amanda” 2:02
  6. Renewal Chorus, “Stratfield” 1:31
  7. Margaret MacArthur, “The Marlboro Medley” 6:14
  8. The Dawnland Singers, “Ki Ga Ka Ney/Skodac Song” 2:25
  9. Robert Resnik & Marty Morrissey, “Battle of Lake Champlain / The Beautiful Lights of Burlington” 5:16
  10. Pete & Karen Sutherland, “1800 and Froze to Death” 3:31
  11. Deb Flanders, “Young Charlotte” 6:03
  12. Mayfly (Katie Trautz & Julia Wayne), “Sister Thou Art Mild and Lovely” 1:52
  13. Buck Heath, “The Woodsman’s Alphabet” 2:10
  14. Atlantic Crossing, “New England Hornpipes: Jenning’s Champion Clog / The Western Gem / Niagara Hornpipe” 5:20
  15. Fiddleheads, “Growling Old Man and Grumbling Old Woman” 1:55
  16. Daisy Turner, “John Saw the Number” 1:15
  17. J.S. Kennison, “Green Mountain Boys” 2:35
  18. Harold Luce and Adam Boyce, “My Wild Irish Rose” 2:12
  19. La Famille Maille, “Strawberries & Raspberries” 2:16
  20. Francois Clemmons, “Bury Me In The Garden” 1:10
  21. Atlantic Crossing, “The Charge at Gettysburg” 4:19
  22. Hand in Hand (Marge Bruchac and Justin Kennick), “Kwawtam” 3:58

Track List, Disc 2

  1. Hand in Hand (Marge Bruchac and Justin Kennick), “Hegonay / Gwanuday” 2:03
  2. Marty Morrissey & Robert Resnik, “The Vermont Farmer’s Song” 2:44
  3. Michèle Choinière, “La Bergère” 1:32
  4. Elmer Barton, “Wilkes Lovell” 1:46
  5. Robert Resnik, “Keep Cool & Keep Coolidge” 2:14
  6. Anais Mitchell, “L’Internazionale” 3:06
  7. Pete and Karen Sutherland, “Green Mountain Moon” 2:38
  8. Don Fields and His Pony Boys, “Pony Boys Theme” 1:13
  9. La Famille Maille, “St. Anne’s Reel” 2:26
  10. The Thunderbolts, “Heart So Cold” 2:12
  11. La Famille Beaudoin, “La Madeleine” 1:45
  12. Jesse Bruchac, “Awon-sis-ak” 2:01
  13. Coco and The Lonesome Road Band, “New England Song” 4:09
  14. Pine Island, “Like a Thief” 2:51
  15. The Wards, “Weapon Factory” 2:10
  16. The Dawnland Singers, “As Long As Earth Abides” 3:43
  17. Phish, “Twist, April 2, 1998 Uniondale, NY” 18:55
  18. Grace Potter & The Nocturnals, “Mr. Columbus” 3:41
  19. The Dawnland Singers, “Warriors in the Twilight” 5:12

“Akin to a hyper-localized Ken Burns documentary… a veritable treasure trove of discovery… The wealth of material found within would likely fascinate even the most casual listener.”

— Dan Bolles, Seven Days

The Cover Art

Darkness - Lake Champlain

The cover image is a detail of “Lake Champlain – Nightfall” (oils), painted by Douglas Lazarus. www.champlainslakerediscovered.org

Production Credits & Thanks

Research and Narrative: Joanna Dillon, Emily Hilliard, Andy Kolovos, Andrew Kuzmin, James Lockridge, Cory Lovell, Takara Matthews. ‘Thrufters’ Identity, PLACE Creative, www.placecreativecompany.com. Mastered by Egan Media, www.eganmedia.com.

Produced by James Lockridge for Big Heavy World.

Kolovos & Flanders

Andy Kolovos and Deb Flanders research songs for ‘Thrufters & Throughstones” in the Helen Hartness Flanders Ballad Collection at Middlebury College.

 

Recordings on this CD set that are part of the Helen Hartness Flanders Ballad Collection were drawn from source material held at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. Local access to the wealth of recordings made by Helen Flanders and her assistants is available through the Special Collections Department of the Middlebury College Library in Middlebury Vermont, where Flanders’ original field recordings, papers, photographs, books and other print materials reside.

Manufactured in Canada by Healey Disc Manufacturing, www.healydisc.com. UPC #6 2598962502 2

We owe very special thanks to those whose generosity of spirit illuminated our way: Alex Aldrich, American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, Gyan Baird, John Barton, Frannie Bastion, Jane Beck, Brent Björkman, Maxine Bleau, Jim Brangan, Chet Briggs, Catherine Brooks, Joseph Bruchac, Marge Bruchac, Jonathan Butler, Paul Carnahan, Marilyn Cormier, Steve Crafts, Jay Craven, Jennifer Crowell, Jennifer Cutting, Patti Daniels, Lynn Delaney, Joe Egan, Jody Evans, Ashley Flanagan, Deb Flanders,  Jonathan Gold, Justin Goldberg, Larry Gordon, Kevin Graffagnino, Judith Gray, Steve Green, Beau Harris, Jennifer Harwood, Buzz Hoerr, Becky Holt, Mark S. Hudson, Victoria Hughes, Bruce Hyde, Michelle Jeffery, Thalia Rose Dickinson Kolovos, Zora May Dickinson Kolovos, Ryan “Boom Boom” Krushenick, Nathan Lamb, Karen Lane, Douglas Lazarus, Sigrid Lumbra, Sarah Lyman, Takara Matthews, Colin McCaffrey, Beth Montuori Rowles, Musical Instrument Museum, Natalie Neuert, Jen Peterson, Keri Piatek Crafts, Jennifer Post, Bill Schubart, Kevin Shapiro, Gregory L. Sharrow, Tim Shea, Gerianne Smart, Kathy Soulia, David Speidel, Victoria St. John, Sophia St. John-Lockridge, Gordon Stone, Mark Sustic, Pete Sutherland, Michael Taft, Michael Townsend, John Van Hoesen, Western Folklife Center, Cheryl Willoughby, Tonya West, Eric Willison, Fred Wiseman, the volunteers of the Big Heavy World crew, and the ‘Thrufters & Throughstones’ artists.

“It was all pretty kamikaze, I had no idea what kinds of songs would be on the record. It was really impressive to finally hear the whole shebang. All these different voices in the community, singing songs from all different eras in all different languages There’s so much richness right in front of our faces. It’s easy to seek inspiration everywhere… I’m grateful to Big Heavy World for giving us all a reason to dig around in the yard like that.”

— Anais Mitchell

Thrufters Logo

Liner Notes, Disc 1

1. Jesse Bowman Bruchac, “Greeting on Flute” 1:12 ©1998 (From the CD ‘Songs of the Wabanaki’).  Written, produced, and recorded by Jesse Bruchac. Jesse Bruchac, flute, drums, rattle. Good Mind Records, P.O. Box 308, Greenfield Center, NY 12033. (518) 584-1728, westernabenaki@gmail.com, westernabenaki.com

That which can be sung in the Abenaki language can also be played on the flute. Both flute and vocal music are carried on the breath. The Abenaki tradition of singing a greeting song — one which says, “Welcome,” or, “Hello, my friends” is embodied in this flute song.

2. Va-et-Vient “A la claire fontaine (At the clear fountain)” 4:02. Traditional. Recorded by Horace Williams, Jr. at Little Castle Studios. Mastered by Horace Williams, Jr. George Dunn, flute; Carol Reed, guitar, vocals; Suzanne Germain, vocals; Michael Corn, guitar. Suzanne Germain, 1322 Colby Hill Rd., Lincoln, VT 05443. suz@madriver.com, www.vaetvient.net.

“A la claire fontaine” is one of the most popular and beloved traditional songs in France, Quebec, and among Franco-Americans in Vermont. It is sung to several melodies and with different refrains. It is said to have been sung as early as 1608 by Champlain’s men. It was most likely composed in the 16th century in Normandy, France. This particular version is not well known.

3. Hanaford’s Volunteers Fyfe and Drum Corps, “The Moon and the Seven Stars” Recorded by Cory Lovell for Big Heavy World. Hanaford’s Vol., P.O. Box 90, Jericho, VT 05465.

Named after the Seven Sisters constellation that is visible in the Northern Hemisphere, this dance tune dates back to the 1750s in England where it was called “The Seven Stars.” After the Revolutionary War in the United States, and after many manuscript publications in New England, the tune became a popular song that is still played at country and square dances today.

4. Va-et-Vient “J’entend le moulin (I hear the mill)” 4:01. (From the CD ‘Va-et-Vient: La porte ouverte’). Traditional. Recorded by John Hadden at Resting Lion Studios. Mastered by George Dunne and Lane Gibson at Chuck Eller Studios. George Dunne, vocals; Carol Reed, guitar, vocals; Suzanne Germain, feet, vocals, spoons; Michael Corn, guitar. Suzanne Germain, 1322 Colby Hill Rd., Lincoln, VT 05443. suz@madriver.com, www.vaetvient.net

“J’entend le moulin” comes from the same time period as the song, “A la claire fontaine.” Its origins can be traced back to as early as 1608.

5. Bayley Hazen Singers, “Amanda” 2:02 Public Domain (From the CD ‘Songs from Northern Harmony’). Recorded and mastered by Common Ground Audio. (802) 426-3210, vharmony@sover.net

“Amanda” was originally written by composer Justin Morgan sometime in the mid-18th century. Morgan, originally a native of West Springfield, MA, first had his songs published in Wallingford, CT native Asahel Benham’s tunebook “Federal Harmony,” of 1790. Morgan eventually moved to Randolph, VT, where he lived out the rest of his days and died in 1798.

Shape note music is part of a tradition of participatory music-making created to help singers sight-read music. The notes are printed as special shapes to help distinguish one note from the next when moving up and down the scale. Shape note music was brought to the U.S. from England with the first Colonial settlers in the 1700s. It is traditionally performed by unaccompanied voices divided into four parts (soprano, alto, tenor, and bass), though the music occasionally has instruments playing one or more of the parts. While Justin Morgan was perhaps most famous for his contribution to horse breeding (the Morgan horse), he contributed greatly to sacred choral music as well.

6. The Renewal Chorus, “Stratfield” 1:31 Written by Ezra Goff and Isaac Watts. Recorded by Luke Hoffman and Will Thomas. Sarah Allard, vocals; Alisha Wright, vocals; Sarah Gibson, vocals; Lauren Breunig, vocals; Nora Weatherby, vocals; Lynn Mahoney, vocals; Will Thomas, vocals; Luke Hoffman, vocals; Ben Aleshire, vocals; Mason Gohl, vocals; Wheaton Squier, vocals; Adam Simon, vocals. The Renewal Chorus, 151 Prospect Ridge, North Clarendon VT, 05759. (802) 345-6460, sarah.m.allard@gmail.com, www.myspace.com/renewalchorus

The words for “Stratfield” were written by Isaac Watts in 1719 and the music was written in 1786 by Ezra Goff. This song can be found in ‘The Sacred Harp,’ a book containing hundreds of songs written using shape notes, a sight-reading aid. Shape note singing and songs from ‘The Sacred Harp’ expanded from the Southern United States into the churches of New England in the late 1700s and into Vermont shortly after. It has experienced a resurgence in popularity in recent years, establishing itself as a community singing tradition. The Renewal Chorus sings the song through once on shape notes and once on words like you would hear at a shape note ‘sing.’.

7. Margaret MacArthur, “The Marlboro Medley” 6:14 ©1989 (From the CD ‘Vermont Ballads and Broadsides’ / Whetstone Records). Margaret MacArthur, dulcimer, vocals. Vermont Folklife Center, Middlebury, VT 05753. (802) 388-4964, akolovos@vermontfolklifecenter.org, www.vermontfolklifecenter.org

“The Marlboro Medley” tells of the many items brought into the colonial village of Marlboro, Vermont, by a peddler, and of the multitudinous products made by the settlers to be offered in trade. The 1787 handwritten manuscript of the song was given to Margaret in the mid-1950s by Elsie Newton Howe of Newfane, Vermont. The manuscript, along with the 1828 letter that accompanied it, are now part of the Margaret MacArthur Collection of the Vermont Folklife Center Archive.

8. The Dawnland Singers, “Ki Ga Ka Ney / Skodac Song” 2:25 ©2009 Good Mind Records (From the CD ‘Honor Songs Gwsintow8ganal’). Written by Jesse Bruchac. Produced by Joe Bruchac, John Kirk and Donald Person. Recorded at Windy Acres and Studio 14. James Bruchac, vocals, drum; Jesse Bruchac, vocals, hand drum; Joseph Bruchac, vocals, drum; Marge Bruchac, vocals, drum, rattle; John Kirk, vocals, rattle; Ed Lowman, vocals. Good Mind Records, P.O. Box 308, Greenfield Center, NY 12833. (518) 584-1728, nudatlog@earthlink.net, www.josephbruchac.com/honorsongs.html

Abenaki communities and sacred places were deeply disturbed by the the inter-tribal and international conflicts that shaped so much of Vermont’s history. This song honors Skodak and other safe places where Abenaki, Mohican, and Kanienkahake Mohawk people tried to make peace during times of conflict.

9. Robert Resnik and Marty Morrissey, “Battle of Lake Champlain / The Beautiful Lights of Burlington” 5:13 ©2008 (From the CD ‘Songs of Lake Champlain’). Written by Philip Freneau and Robert Resnik. “The Beautiful Lights of Burlington” ©1982 Pete Sutherland. Produced by Marty Morrissey and Robert Resnik. Recorded at Southview Arts, Middletown Springs, VT. Mastered by Ryan Dubois. Robert Resnik, vocals, guitar, hurdy gurdy; Marty Morrissey, vocals, bodhran. Robert Resnik, P.O. Box 792, Burlington, VT 05402.

“The Battle of Lake Champlain” began as a poem by Philip Freneau, an American poet, 1752-1832. The poem was edited by Robert Resnik and Marty Morrissey, and Resnik added the refrain. The second half of the song, “The Beautiful Lights of Burlington” is a waltz taken from Pete Sutherland’s 1998 album ‘Poor Man’s Dream.’

10. Pete and Karen Sutherland, “1800 and Froze to Death” 3:31 © Pete Sutherland p Epact Music (BMI) (From the CD ‘Pass the Word Downriver’/ Epact Records). Traditional / Pete Sutherland. Produced by Pete and Karen Sutherland. Recorded by Horace Williams at Little Castle Studios. Pete Sutherland, guitar, fiddle, harmonica, vocals; Karen Sutherland, vocals. Pete Sutherland, P.O. Box 123, Monkton, VT 05465. (802) 453-3795, epact@gmavt.net, www.epactmusic.com

“1800 and Froze to Death” takes its words from an early 19th century broadside sheet from Dummerston, Vermont. Sutherland added music and the words to the chorus, which never did use the phrase “1800 and froze to death,” despite the title of the poem. The song recounts the summer of 1816 in which a sudden climate shift affected Northern Europe, the Canadian Maritimes, and the American Northeast. Cropland was severely damaged by early planting season frost and snowstorms in June. Famine and disease caused many deaths. The song has also been recorded by Vermont-based Cindy Mangsen and Steve Gillette and the group Nightingale.

11. Deb Flanders, “Young Charlotte” 6:03 © Deb Flanders (From the CD ‘Mother Make My Bed’). Produced by Pete Sutherland. Recorded by Charles Eller and Lane Gibson. Mastered by Charles Eller and Lane Gibson at Charles Eller Studios. Deb Flanders, vocals; Pete Sutherland, piano; Rick Presson, double bass. debflanders@comcast.net, www.debflanders.com

While not a native Vermont ballad, the twenty field recordings of “Young Charlotte” made by Helen Hartness Flanders in the 1930s, 40s and 50s are certainly suggestive of its lasting popularity in the state. The plot — a young woman freezing to death on the way to a dance as a result of her vanity — would have resonated with Vermonters in the 19th and early 20th centuries. References to sleighs, mountain roads, snowstorms and deep cold would have provided an undoubtedly familiar setting for the ballad’s grim moral and morbid conclusion. Like many ballads, “Young Charlotte” originated from a literary source. Folklorist Philips Barry traced the origin of the song to an 1843 poem written by New York-based journalist Selba Smith under the title, “A Corpse Goes to A Ball.” Deb Flanders paid tribute to her great-aunt Helen Hartness Flanders with her 1997 recording of “Young Charlotte” and other songs from the Hartness-Flanders collection.

VPR

Andy Kolovos of the Vermont Folklife Center discusses this track with host Jane Lindholm on Vermont Public Radio’s Vermont Edition: http://www.vpr.net/news_detail/85398/vt-edition-young-charlotte/

12. Mayfly (Katie Trautz and Julia Wayne), “Sister Thou Art Mild and Lovely” 1:52 (From the CD ‘Mayfly’). Traditional. Produced by Mayfly. Recorded and mastered by Colin McCaffrey. Katie Trautz, vocals; Julia Wayne, vocals. Katie Trautz/Summit School, P.O. Box 646, Montpelier, VT 05601. (802) 279-2236, katietrautz@yahoo.com, www.myspace.com/mayflygirls

“Sister” is a traditional song that has traveled up and down the Appalachain Mountains, each time taking on the character of the specific region it’s found in. The lyrics to this song, which is an old Baptist hymn, were found by local composer Seth Houston on a gravestone in Barnet, Vermont. Houston then composed his own shape-note tune to fit the lyrics. The version that Mayfly sings has been modernized by a slight change to the lyrics: Instead of the traditional words, “Sister, thou art mild and lovely,” Trautz and Wayne sing, “Sister, thou art wild and lovely.” This is an example of how traditional songs are passed along and each artist adds his or her own touch.

13. Buck Heath “The Woodsman’s Alphabet” 2:10 ©Vermont Folklife Center (From the Vermont Folklife Center archive). Traditional. Recorded by Jane C. Beck. Buck Heath, vocals. Vermont Folklife Center, Middlebury, VT 05753. (802) 388-4964, akolovos@vermontfolklifecenter.org, www.vermontfolklifecenter.org

The “Woodsman’s Alphabet,” alongside other songs such as “The Jam on Jerry’s Rock,” is one of the emblematic songs of the lumber woods. Buck Heath of Hyde Park, Vermont, was in many respects the quintessential Vermont lumberman. Buck spent much of his life working in the woods cutting trees, ultimately running his own sawmill. Through his work Buck developed a knowledge of the songs of the woodsmen and an interest in performing them for friends and family.

14. Atlantic Crossing, “New England Hornpipes” 5:17 mp Atlantic Crossing (From the CD ‘Full and Away’ / Mountain Road). Traditional. Produced by Pete Sutherland. Recorded by Peter Engisch at Ad Astra Recording, Williston, VT. Mastered by Lane Gibson at Charles Eller Studios, Charlotte, VT. Viveka Fox, fiddle; Rick Klein, guitar; Peter Macfarlane, fiddle; Brian Perkins, tenor banjo. Atlantic Crossing, 1379 Mountain Rd., Vergennes, VT 05491. (802) 759-2268, petermac@gmav.net, www.atlanticcrossingvt.com

This track was inspired by a radio interview with an old woman who had worked in the Massachusetts textile mills when she was young. She recalled the step dancing contests in which the factory girls wore wooden shoes and danced in an effort to imitate the rhythms of the mill machinery. On this track, the clogs are coupled with hornpipes at a contradance tempo.

15. Fiddleheads, “Growling Old Man, Grumbling Old Woman” 1:55 ©2006 Fiddleheads (From the CD ‘Fiddleheads 2006’). Traditional. Matt Bean, fiddle; Roland Clark, fiddle; Hannah Crary, fiddle; Eliza Done, fiddle; Catherine Fortier, fiddle; Sarah King, fiddle; Amy Malinowski, fiddle; Ian Muneshwar, fiddle; Maria Naumann, fiddle; Torrey Webster, fiddle; Brittany Wieland, fiddle; Mark Sustic, fiddle. Mark Sustic, Fiddleheads, P.O. Box 163, Fairfax, VT 05454. (802) 849-6968, mrksustc@together.net, www.fiddleheads.org

“Growling Old Man and Grumbling Old Woman” is a traditional fiddle tune heard in many fiddling traditions from Ireland to Scotland to Cape Breton to Quebec to Vermont. It is a popular tune for dances, fiddle contests and music sessions with a long history dating back to at least the 19th century. The first half of the tune (played on the fiddle in the low register) sounds the man’s part and the second half (high register) is the lady’s. In 1973 legendary fiddler Louis Beaudoin from Burlington recorded it on his debut recording on Philo Records and Ron West recorded it on Smithsonian Folkways ‘Mademoiselle, Voulez-Vous Danser?’

VPR

Andy Kolovos of the Vermont Folklife Center discusses this track with host Jane Lindholm on Vermont Public Radio’s Vermont Edition: http://www.vpr.net/audio/news/regional_news/2009/07/2009_0721_vtedc.mp3

16. Daisy Turner, “John Saw the Number” 1:15 ©Vermont Folklife Center (From the Vermont Folklife Center archive). Traditional. Recorded by Jane C. Beck. Daisy Turner, vocals. Vermont Folklife Center, Middlebury, VT 05753. (802) 388-4964, akolovos@vermontfolklifecenter.org, www.vermontfolklifecenter.org

Former slaves Alec and Sally Turner settled in Grafton, Vermont in the years following the Civil War. We know much about the lives of Alec and Sally from their daughter, Daisy Turner, who lived to be 104 years old. Daisy shared her life and family stories with Jane Beck of the Vermont Folklife Center over a series of interviews conducted in the early 1980s. In addition to family stories and her own memories, Daisy also recorded many of the songs she learned from her father. Among these songs were ballads, 19th century popular tunes, hymns and the old African-American spiritual, “John Saw the Number.” According to Daisy, slaves on the Goulden Plantation used “John Saw the Number” as a song to coordinate work, in particular hauling seine nets in the Rappahannock River.

17. J.S. Kennison, “The Green Mountain Boys” 2:35
(From the CD ‘Helen Hartness Flanders Collection,’ (call number: AFS 3754a) / American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, used with permission. Traditional. Recorded by Alan Lomax and Helen Hartness Flanders. J.S. Kennison, vocals. Library of Congress American Folklife Center, 101 Independence Ave. SE, Washington, D.C. 20540-4610. (202) 707-5510, folklife@loc.gov

“Green Mountain Boys” is a Vermont adaptation of “The Backwoodsman,” a widely distributed North American lumberman’s song. “Green Mountain Boys” tells the story of a young wood hauler who gets drunk during a stop in town and is persuaded by a friend to attend a dance that night. The protagonist makes his way to the dance, eludes his father who is searching for him and has a wild night of dancing and drinking that ends in time for him to begin work the next morning. Somewhat ashamed of himself, the young man concludes by admonishing potential gossips: “Come all you good old people that carry the news about / Don’t tell any lies, ’tis bad enough without / Don’t tell any lies for to make any fuss / You’ve been guilty of the same, only a good deal worse.”

18. Harold Luce and Adam Boyce “My Wild Irish Rose”
© Harold Luce and Adam Boyce (From the Vermont Folklife Center archive). Written by Chauncey Olcott, 1899. Recorded by Andy Kolovos. Harold Luce, fiddle; Adam Boyce, piano. Vermont Folklife Center, Middlebury, VT 05753. (802) 388-4964, akolovos@vermontfolklifecenter.org, www.vermontfolklifecenter.org

Master fiddler Harold Luce first began playing dances in and around Chelsea, Vermont in the 1930s. One of the earliest songs he learned was “My Wild Irish Rose.” Composed in the late 1800s by Chauncey Ollcott for the play “A Romance of Athlone,” “My Wild Irish Rose” was, and remains, an extremely popular song in the United States. Songs played at Vermont country dances in the past and present are drawn from a wide variety of sources. Older traditional songs with roots in England, Ireland and Scotland can be heard alongside songs like “My Wild Irish Rose” that were composed by professional musicians, as well as songs learned from the radio, recordings, or even commercial jingles. Harold doesn’t remember who taught him the song or when he first played it, but it continues to be part of his repertoire to this day. Harold and Adam play “My Wild Irish Rose” as a waltz: a slow, stately dance for couples.

19. La Famille Maille, “Strawberries & Raspberries”
© Vermont Folklife Center. (From the Vermont Folklife Center archive). Traditional. Recorded by Gregory L. Sharrow. George Maille, fiddle; George Maille, Jr., guitar; Mark Maille, spoons. Vermont Folklife Center, Middlebury, VT 05753. (802) 388-4964, akolovos@vermontfolklifecenter.org, www.vermontfolklifecenter.org

George Maille, a Franco-American Vermonter, began playing the fiddle at the age of four. Later in life He formed a band with his sons George Jr., Paul, and Mark. The Maille’s repertoire contained Irish, Scottish, and American as well as French Canadian tunes, all played with the distinctive accent of their Franco-American heritage. “Strawberries and Raspberries” is a traditional Franco-American dance tune, and this field recording, made in the Maille living room as a part of the Vermont Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program, features George Sr., George Jr.,  and Mark Maille during an informal jam session.

20. François Clemmons, “Bury Me In The Garden” 1:10 ©2004 Vermont Public Radio (From the CD ‘The Songs of Alec Turner’). Traditional. Recorded live in performance by Vermont Public Radio. François Clemmons, vocals. The Vermont Folklife Center, 88 Main Street, Middlebury, VT 05753. (802) 388-4964, www.vermontfolklifecenter.org

“Bury Me in the Garden” is another African-American spiritual passed on to Daisy Turner by her father, Alec. As Daisy explained to folklorist Jane Beck, in the Turner family the song “Bury Me in the Garden” carried a double meaning: An expressed desire to be close to family in death, and a hidden reference to money saved by Alec and buried in the family garden on the plantation to buy his freedom or to be used if he escaped. When Alec fled the Goulden Plantation during the Civil War and joined up with the First New Jersey Calvary, he took the money with him. This performance is by Middlebury College Twilight Scholar and Artist-in-Residence, François Clemmons — a tenor, as was Alec Turner.

21. Atlantic Crossing, “The Charge at Gettysburg” 4:19 mp Atlantic Crossing (From the CD ‘Turning the Compass’ / Mountain Road). Traditional. Produced by Atlantic Crossing. Recorded and mastered by Peter Engisch at Ad Astra Recording, Williston, VT. Viveka Fox, fiddle; Rick Klein, guitar; Peter Macfarlane, fiddle; Brian Perkins, vocal, bouzouki. Atlantic Crossing, 1379 Mountain Rd., Vergennes, VT 05491. (802) 759-2268, petermac@gmav.net, www.atlanticcrossingvt.com

Vermont Folklorist Helen Hartness Flanders collected close to 4,500 traditional songs from the oral tradition of New England families between the years 1930 and 1966. Included in this collection are numerous Civil War ballads, which focus almost exclusively on the men who never came home. “The Charge at Gettysburg” is an adaptation of a ballad sung by Lyddie Tenent of East Orland, ME for Mrs. Flanders in 1942.

22. Hand in Hand (Marge Bruchac and Justin Kennick), “Kwawtam” 3:58 ©1996 (From the CD ‘Zahkiwi Lintow8ganal / Voices in the Woods’). Written by Jesse Bruchac and Lalania Boots. Produced by Marge Bruchac. Recorded at Spare Room Studio, Bethlehem, NH. Marge Bruchac, vocals; Justin Kennick, vocals. Marge Bruchac and Justin Kennick, 63 Franklin St., Northampton, MA 01060. (413) 584-2195, maligeet@earthlink.net, www.maligeet.net/Hand_in_Hand.html

“Tonialonsan,” in the Abenaki language, is a question: “Where are you going?” This song includes traditional expressions of thanks (“Wlioni, nokomes, nmahom, nigawes, nmit8gwes,” meaning “Thank you, grandmother, grandfather, mother, father”) as it speaks about the importance of cultural connection and finding one’s way home.

Grace Potter

Grace Potter performs at the 2009 Burlington International Waterfront Festival produced by Jay Craven for the State of Vermont and City of Burlington. Pine Island also performed at the festival, which hosted the release of ‘Thrufters.’

 

Liner Notes, Disc 2

1. Hand in Hand (Marge Bruchac and Justin Kennick), “Hegonay/Gwanuday” 3:58 ©1996 (From the CD ‘Zahkiwi Lintow8ganal / Voices in the Woods’). Written by Jesse Bruchac and Lalania Boots. Produced by Marge Bruchac. Recorded at Spare Room Studio, Bethlehem, NH. Marge Bruchac, vocals; Justin Kennick, vocals. Marge Bruchac and Justin Kennick, 63 Franklin St., Northampton, MA 01060. (413) 584-2195, maligeet@earthlink.net, www.maligeet.net/Hand_in_Hand.html

The Abenaki word, “Gwanuday,” is heard in many of the different Wabanaki “greeting songs.” This cut combines a greeting song with a feast song, typically sung at gatherings that brought different tribal bands or tribes together.

VPR

Andy Kolovos of the Vermont Folklife Center discusses this track with host Jane Lindholm on Vermont Public Radio’s Vermont Edition: http://www.vpr.net/news_detail/85426/vt-edition-la-bergre-hegonaygwanuday/

2. Robert Resnik and Marty Morrissey, “The Vermont Farmer’s Song” 2:46 ©2005 Marty Morrissey and Robert Resnik (From the CD ‘Vermont Songs, Old & New’). Produced by Marty Morrissey and Robert Resnik. Recorded at Southview Arts, Middletown Springs, VT. Mastered by Egan Media Services. Marty Morrisey, vocals, guitar; Robert Resnik, vocals, button box, bells. Robert Resnik, P.O. Box 792, Burlington, VT 05402.

“The Vermont Farmer’s Song” was originally recorded by Vermont songcatcher Margaret MacArthur on her 1982 cassette ‘An Almanac of New England Farm Songs.’ She found the song in the Helen Hartness Flanders collection of Vermont folksongs. Flanders identified the composer as “Jonathan Saxe, 19th century.” John Godfrey Saxe was a popular Vermont poet who lived from 1816-1887; his name is included in the historic stained glass window in the Fletcher Free Library’s Carnegie building in Burlington along with the names of Vermont historian Zadock Thompson and Vermont author Rowland Robinson as three Vermonters who epitomized “Art, Literature, and Science.”

3. Michèle Choinière, “La Bergère” 1:32 mp 2003 Michèle Choinière ASCAP (From the CD ‘Coeur Fragile’) Traditional, arrangement by Michèle Choinière. Recorded and mixed by Lane Gibson at Charles Eller Studios, Charlotte, VT. Produced by Bill Garrett. Mastered by Lane Gibson at Charles Eller Studios, Charlotte, VT. Michèle Choinière, vocals; Gaston Bernard, feet; Benoit Bourque, bones; Simon Lepage, bass; Brian Barlow, rek; Eric Beaudry, vocals. Michèle Choinière, 112 Pearl St., St Albans, VT 05478. (802) 318-5191, chrisrottler@yahoo.com, www.michelechoiniere.com

“La Bergere” (“The Shepherdess”) is an arrangement of the traditional French folk song “Il etait une bergere,” made popular around 1765. The song arrived in Vermont in the early 1900s when many Quebec natives came to the mills to work. Choinière first learned it while cooking with her mother, who learned many songs from her aunts and uncles of the De Repentigny and Riendeau families of St. Remi, Quebec. The girl, who is the subject of the song, is making cheese from milk. A cat comes along and wants to drink the milk, but the girl tells it “if you put your paw in that milk, I’m going to give you a tap.” Instead, the cat puts its chin in the milk, and out of anger, the girl kills the cat. The song is arranged in a minor key to better express the meaning of the song, and to appeal to a modern audience.

VPR

Andy Kolovos of the Vermont Folklife Center discusses this track with host Jane Lindholm on Vermont Public Radio’s Vermont Edition: http://www.vpr.net/news_detail/85426/vt-edition-la-bergre-hegonaygwanuday/

4. Elmer Barton, “Wilkes Lovell” 1:46 (From the Helen Hartness Flanders Collection (call number: AFS 3754a) / American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, used with permission. Traditional. Recorded by Alan Lomax and Helen Hartness Flanders. J.S. Kennison, vocals. Library of Congress American Folklife Center, 101 Independence Ave. SE, Washington, D.C. 20540-4610. (202) 707-5510, folklife@loc.gov

“Wilkes Lovell” also known as “Springfield Jail” is an indigenous Vermont ballad that details events related to a jail break in the town of Springfield in the 1890s. “Wilkes Lovell” refers to the hero of the story, then Windsor County sheriff Wilkes S. Lovell. As with many historical ballads, there is disagreement about the events behind the song. According to research done by Helen Hartness Flanders, the two men who sought to escape were in custody for “theft of a harness.” Singer Elmer Barton offers a different tale, attributing the song to a George Blake of North Springfield, Vermont, who wrote it after his brother John and cousin Andrew were arrested following a raucous night of carousing.

5. Robert Resnik, “Keep Cool and Keep Coolidge” 2:14 ©1924 Hometown Coolidge Club. Written by Bruce Harper and Ida Cheever Goodwin. Recorded in the Vermont Public Radio performance studio on February 15, 2008 for ‘Vermont Edition.’ Produced by Sarah Ashworth. Engineered by Sam Sanders. Robert Resnik, vocals and guitar. Robert Resnik, P.O. Box 792, Burlington, VT 05402. (802) 865-7222, rresnik@vpr.net, www.vpr.net

Also known as “Keep Cool With Coolidge”, this was the official 1924 Calvin Coolidge campaign song of the Hometown Coolidge Club, Plymouth, VT.

6. Anais Mitchell “L’Internazionale” 3:06 ASCAP. Recorded by Colin McCaffrey at The Green Room. Anais Mitchell, vocals, guitar. Slim Moon / Shotclock Management, 7912 NE Failing St. Unit D, Portland, OR 97213. (503) 719-7036, slim@shotclockmanagement.com

In 1875 the railroad linked Barre to distant cities, creating opportunities for businesses and making granite quarries the dominant local enterprise. A large community of immigrant Italian stonecutters gathered, bringing their political culture of social and labor reform with them, including “L’Internazionale” which was sung in many languages around the world. “L’Internazionale,” originally penned in French in 1871 and set to music in 1888, became the anthem of international socialism. Italian stonecutters built Barre’s historic Old Labor Hall as a meeting hall for their Socialist Labor Party. Vermonter Anais Mitchell’s beautiful soprano voice caught the attention of Ani DiFranco who signed her to Righteous Babe Records in 2004.

7. Pete and Karen Sutherland, “Green Mountain Moon” 2:28 © Carol Swanson and Pete Sutherland p(Unknown), republished by Epact Music (BMI) (From the CD ‘Pass the Word Downriver’ / Epact Records). Written by Carl Swanson and Pete Sutherland. Produced by Pete and Karen Sutherland. Recorded by Horace Williams at Little Castle Studios. Pete Sutherland, guitar, vocals; Karen Sutherland, auto harp, vocals. Pete Sutherland, P.O. Box 123, Monkton, VT 05465. (802) 453-3795, epact@gmavt.net, www.epactmusic.com

Coming from New York City’s late 19th and early 20th century Tin Pan Alley music publishers, “Green Mountain Moon” is a song by Carl Swanson that was discovered by Pete Sutherland who supplied additional lyrics. The “Green Mountain Moon” title and tune has also appeared in two different collections of cowboy songs.

8. Don Fields and His Pony Boys, “Pony Boys Theme” 1:13 mp2004 (From the album ‘Don Fields and His Pony Boys: Historic WDEV Broadcasts’). Written by Don Fields. Produced by Mark Greenberg. Recorded by Ernest Meteyer. Mastered by Mark Greenberg and Geoff Brumbaugh. Don Fields, fiddle, vocals; Hartwell “Squeeze” Weber, accordion; Carl Durgin, guitar; Ray Preauy, bass. Up Street Productions, 12 Guerusey Ave., Montpelier, VT 05602. (802) 224-4510, markgvt@yahoo.com, www.upstreetproductions.com

From the 1930s through the 1950s, Vermont radio stations broadcast the sounds of “cowboy bands,” playing a mix of traditional fiddle tunes, country and western songs, jazz standards and pop tunes of the day. Don Fields, virtuoso fiddler of Waterbury, was considered the king of Vermont cowboy bands and his Pony Boys became the region’s favorite dance band. The “Pony Boys Theme” is one of the rare recordings of live WDEV radio shows from the 1940s.

9. La Famille Maille, “St Anne’s Reel” 2:26 mp2003
(From the CD ‘Kitchen Tunks and Parlor Songs / Multicultural Media). Traditional. Produced by Mark Greenberg. Recorded by Mark Greenberg. Mastered by Mark Greenberg and Geoff Prumbaugh. George Maille, fiddle; Mark Maille, mandolin; George Maille Jr., guitar; Paul Maille, guitar. Up Street Productions, 12 Guerusey Ave., Montpelier, VT 05602. (802) 229-4510, markgvt@yahoo.com, www.upstreetproductions.com

This ubiquitous dance tune has become a theme song for fiddlers. Originally a song of Irish origins, the song is now considered predominantly French-Canadian. Being a reel, the song is best fit for dancing. This tune is often played at fiddler gatherings, and is so well known that everyone will get up and play it together.

10. The Thunderbolts, “Heart So Cold” 2:12 ©2004 Baccus Archives (From the CD ‘Heart So Cold: The North Country’s 60s Scene’). Written by Marc Chapman, Bob Lavigne and Jim Ricker. Produced by E.F. Auchter. Recorded in 1965 at Stereo Sound Studios, Montreal, Quebec. Marc Chapman, drums, vocals; Bob Lavigne, guitar, vocals; Jim Ricker, bass, vocals. Dionysus Records, P.O. Box 1975, Burbank, CA 91507. www.dionysusrecords.com

Originally formed in 1960 in Plattsburgh, NY, The Thunderbolts relocated to Burlington, Vermont in 1963. The band recorded two 45s under their own name for Rondack Records, as well as an instrumental under the name Shawn & The Sunnys. For a brief period of time, adding members from Mike and The Ravens, they backed Sandu Scott and appeared on the Ed Sullivan show in 1964. After leaving Sandu and The Scotties, The Thunderbolts became a trio once again, and in the summer of 1965 recorded their biggest hit “Heart So Cold.” The song quickly became popular in the Burlington, VT music scene, and became the second best selling single of that year.

11. La Famille Beaudoin, “La Madeleine” 1:42 mp2003 (From the CD ‘Kitchen Tunks and Parlor Songs’ /  Multicultural Media). Traditional. Produced by Mark Greenberg. Recorded by Mark Greenberg. Mastered by Mark Greenberg and Geoff Prumbaugh. Willy Beaudoin, fiddle; Lillian Beaudoin, vocals. Up Street Productions, 12 Guerusey Ave., Montpelier, VT 05602. (802) 229-4510, markgvt@yahoo.com, www.upstreetproductions.com

For many years, La Famille Beaudoin was considered the premiere Franco-American family musical group. The family moved from the Laurentian region of Canada to Lowell, MA so the father could work in a textile mill. Willy Beaudoin and his brothers resettled in Burlington, Vermont where they continued to play as a group. In 1976, La Famille Beaudoin played for President Carter’s inauguration and also appeared at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Folk Festival. “La Madeleine” is a traditional Franco-American song. Willy is joined here by his son, Roger (guitar), his wife, Lillian (piano, vocal), and his brother Bob (harmonica).

12. Jesse Bruchac, “Awon-sis-ak” 2:01 ©1998 Good Mind Records (From the CD ‘Pa-be-kon-gan Flute Songs’). Written, produced, and recorded by Jesse Bruchac. Jesse Bruchac, flute, guitar, drum, rattle. Good Mind Records, P.O. Box 308, Greenfield Center, NY 12033. (518) 584-1728, westernabenaki@gmail.com, http://westernabenaki.com

“Awon-sis-ak” is a composition that draws inspiration from a traditional Abenaki “friendship dance,” combining the traditional sounds of wooden spruce flute, rattle, and hand drum with a modern style of folk guitar.

13. Coco and The Lonesome Road Band, “New England Song” 4:09 ©1975 p1976 (Single 45 / MCW Records). Written by Coco Kallis. Produced and recorded by Mike Figlio. Coco Kallis, lead vocals; Paul Miller, harmony vocals, rhythm guitar; Mark Greenberg, electric guitar; Rob Hyleys, pedal steel guitar; Eugene White Jr., bass; Billy Blackwood, drums; The Backup Singers, backup vocals. Up Street Productions, 12 Guerusey Ave., Montpelier, VT 05602. (802) 229-4510, markgvt@yahoo.com, www.upstreetproductions.com

In the 1970s, Coco & The Lonesome Road Band combined elements of country, folk, soul, and rock into a style of ”up-home country music” that appealed to both older Vermonters and back-to-the-landers and other newer transplants. Formed as Coco & Friends in 1972 by Coco Kallis and Mark Greenberg, the group became the Lonesome Road Band with the addition of Paul Miller, whose tight harmony singing with Coco became the group’s trademark. Coco wrote “New England Song” after the band opened for Nashville legend Hank Snow at Frye’s Barn, in Danville, Vermont. The song became an award-winning regional favorite and the group recorded it in Nashville for Music City Workshop Records in 1975.

14. Pine Island, “Like a Thief” 2:51 ©1978 Mule-zic Publishing BMI (From the CD ‘Pine Island: Circa 1978’). Written by Jim McGinniss. Recorded by Garvey Hill at Mountainside Recording Studio, Northfield, VT. Mastered by Robert Hurley and Pine Island. Tim McKenzie, vocals, guitar; David Gusakov, vocal harmony, fiddle; Jimmy Ryan, mandolin; Jim McGinniss, bass; Chris Lee, banjo; Gordon Stone, pedal steel guitar.

Pine Island’s music ranged from traditional bluegrass to Hank Williams, Fats Waller, and Rolling Stones covers, along with original material. The band began in 1973 as a guitar, bass, banjo trio. Within three years, they added a fiddler, mandolinist, even occasional guest vocalists, making them not just one of the first bluegrass bands in the region, but one of the first “jazzgrass” bands anywhere. Named after a dry spot in the middle of the swampy Burlington Intervale, Pine Island included banjo player Gordon Stone until 1978. Stone continues to be a prominent musician in Vermont, putting together bluegrass and world music projects around the state.

15. The Wards, “Weapon Factory” 2:10 (From the CD ‘The World Ain’t Pretty and Neither are We’). Written by Tea Curley and Bob “Beano” Parker. Produced by Big Al. Recorded at Gemini Studios, Londonderry, VT. Tea Curley, lead vocals; Bob “Beano” Parker, lead guitar, bass guitar, backing vocals; Mark “Doofy” Default, drums, backing vocals. The Wards, 296 Nichols Rd., Fairfax, VT 05454.

Inspired by protests against a weapon factory in Burlington in the mid 1980s, “Weapon Factory” is unapologetic in its message and delivery. Punk rock and its variants of hardcore and new wave music rose in Vermont after 1977 on the shoulders of bands like Nation of Hate, Screaming Broccoli, No Fun, The Decentz, Pinhead, and the X-Tractions but The Wards are recognized as the grandfathers of the genre in the region.

VPR

Andy Kolovos of the Vermont Folklife Center discusses this track with host Jane Lindholm on Vermont Public Radio’s Vermont Edition: http://www.vpr.net/news_detail/85438/vt-edition-weapon-factory/

16. The Dawnland Singers, “As Long As Earth Abides” 3:42 ©2009 Good Mind Records (From the CD ‘Honor Songs / Gwsintow8ganal’). Written by Joseph Bruchac, Jesse Bruchac and John Kirk. Recorded at Windy Acres and Studio 14. Produced by Joseph Bruchac, John Kirk and Donald Person. Jesse Bruchac, guitar; Joseph Bruchac, vocals, guitar; John Kirk, vocals, guitar, violin; Ed Lowman, bass. Good Mind Records, P.O. Box 308, Greenfield Center, NY 12833. (518) 584-1728, nudatlog@earthlink.net, www.josephbruchac.com/honorsongs.html

“As Long As Earth Abides” honors those who went before us: Our ancestors and all the ancestors of those who lived before us on this land. We are made from our mother, the earth, and our bodies return to our mother. Our old ones are no further from us than the other side of a fallen leaf.

17. Phish, “Twist” 18:55 ©1998 Who Is She? Music, Inc. (BMI). Written by Anastasio/Marshall. Recorded live April 2, 1998, Uniondale, NY. Trey Anastasio, guitar, vocals; Jon Fishman, drums, vocals; Mike Gordon, bass, vocals; Page McConnell, keyboard. Phish, Inc. / JEMP Records, 33 Main Street, Ste. 5, Burlington, VT 05401. (802) 651-0977

Originally known as “Twist Around,” this track was written for the album ‘The Story of a Ghost,’ but was left off the final cut. It was subsequently rearranged and released on the 2000 album, ‘Farmhouse.’ Officially debuting live on June 14, 1997 in Dublin, Ireland, this particular live rendition comes from April 2, 1998 at the Nasseau Coliseum in Uniondale, NY. Some versions of this song are played relatively straight through with little improvisation; this version, however, features extended improvisation by the band.

18. Grace Potter and the Nocturnals, “Mr. Columbus” 3:41 mp 2007 Hollywood Records (From the CD ‘This Is Somewhere’). Recorded at Glenwood Place Studios, Burbank, CA / Chaton Studios, Phoenix, AZ / 60 Cycle Studios, Brooklyn, NY / Peaceful Waters Music, Pound Rivers, NY. Produced by Mike Daly and Grace Potter and The Nocturnals. Mastered by Chris Athens at Sterling Sound. Grace Potter, vocals, keyboard, guitar; Scott Tournet, guitar; Matt Burr, drums; Bryan Dondero, bass, mandolin. Hollywood Records, 500 S. Buena Vista St., Burbank, CA 91521. (310) 943-7164 justin@measurementarts.com, www.gracepotter.com

Grace Potter & The Nocturnals, with their contemporary American rock’n’roll, reflect an emerging career track for many contemporary rock bands. They’ve chosen management that allows them to preserve their individuality, artistry, and control of their destiny within the music industry. Their enormous success around the country, and their most recent album, ‘This is Somewhere’, has been a model for independent-minded up-and-coming Vermont bands.

19. The Dawnland Singers, “Warriors in the Twilight” 5:12 ©2009 Good Mind Records (From the CD ‘Honor Songs Gwsintow8ganal’). Written by Joseph Bruchac. Produced by Joseph Bruchac, John Kirk and Donald Person. Recorded at Windy Acres and Studio 14. James Bruchac, vocals; Jesse Bruchac, vocals, guitar; Joseph Bruchac, vocals, guitar; Marge Bruchac, vocals; John Kirk, vocals, guitar, violin; Ed Lowman, vocals, bass. Good Mind Records, P.O. Box 308, Greenfield Center, NY 12833. (518) 584-1728, nudatlog@earthlink.net, www.josephbruchac.com/honorsongs.html

Warriors come in many shapes, including those who work quietly behind the scenes to hold their communities together. This modern song, backed up by a traditional chant, speaks to the modern struggles of Native people who are forced to cope with ethnic conflicts as they seek spiritual connection, political sovereignty, cultural survival, and peaceful coexistence.

A Vermont Quadricentennial Project

Quadricentennial Endorsement