lawrencewelksgray

Words by Sarah Frazier.

Joining the IndieCon lineup this year is Lawrence Welks and Our Bears to Cross, playing Friday, November 11th alongside Caring Babies and Shawn Grady at the BCA Center  (135 Church Street, Burlington). What sets the band apart from their counterparts? The influence of God and Christian undertones that really sets them apart from some of the other acts to follow. When I got some feedback from the group, I was surprised by some of their answers.

With some sarcastic twists, I knew that any stereotypes that I may have innocently planted in my head about this Christian singing band were false from the get go. Getting involved with IndieCon through their friend Nick, LWBC were uncertain what the event actually was. However, even that being the case once the venue was announced they jumped right on, “We definitely wanted to play at BCA because it’s the classiest venue in town.”

Involved with the local Vermont music scene I was curious on their take of how, as a Christian band of sorts, they fit into the mix. What I got was the general idea that Burlington itself always allows almost any band to flourish creatively, or as they put it, “…cause no one gives a fuck.  It’s a good place to start a cult following of devotees, also heard that we can carry concealed so that’s cool.” Whoa, not what I expected, but then again most of their answers ended up being counter to previous notions or stereotypes.

To be honest, most of what I received was a mix of sarcastic and somewhat intense answers to an array of questions concerning their own sound, and their thoughts on what most people conceive when first hearing about them. On that note, I asked the band about their own views on their individual sound and lyrical inspiration. In regards to their sound, they kept the comedic side alive: “Christian, generic, light rock, little pop, acoustic electric guitars are crucial.  Definitely inspirational. Keyboard drummer, Brickhouse Jackson. Any psalm that we have online would be a good place to start.” Once again, not taking themselves too seriously, the band plays into the idea of this genre, but also adds their own tone throughout.

Jumping back on the sarcasm wagon, we got onto the topic of lyrical inspiration, and whether or not a collaborative effort was involved. The answers I got had me laughing for a good two minutes out loud while people eating around me probably thought I looked like a crazy person. Concerning ideas of lyrical inspiration and collaboration the band tells, “God, through his servant David, the poet-king. No, not so collaborative because it’s straight out of the book, except that we use a bunch a translations so it’s sort of a group effort by the editors.” Well David the poet-king seems to be serving the band well.

However, despite what externally might seem comedic the band makes it clear their message is to stay true to God. I followed up with questions concerning the trials and tribulations that being part of a band can have. Their answer was compelling because I saw a raw honesty to it that made me feel that I was talking to some people of passion, but kept me laughing at the same time. Their response:

“Most liberals in Burlington are really afraid of God and anyone that wants to bring up non-eastern religion unless it can be mixed with yoga or environmentalism. People can’t take God seriously so they think we’re joking, that’s an issue, or making fun of God, which is  downright wrong. Really, if we had sorted through those obstacles we would be pretty famous and this interview would not be happening,  but glad it is because we’re not so famous yet.  Oh yeah, forgot a huge obstacle which is WRUV so **** them.”

Like I said, there is a combination of passion and comedic sensibility that sort of draws you to this band’s personality. With that in mind, IndieCon is sure to have its hands full. If you want to see more of Lawrence Welks and Our Bear to Cross, come join the fun at the BCA center on Church St., November 11.